Bahá’í House of Worship-Australia

All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Temple of Australia, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome. Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature.
Its nine sides and nine entrances symbolically represent the unity of the human race under the one God, irrespective of ethnic and religious background, according to the teachings of the Baha’i Faith.

Bahá’í House of Worship-Kampala

All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Temple of Australia, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome. Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature.
The architectural firm of Cobb, Powell, and Freeman which designed the Bulange, the administrative center of the former kingdom of Buganda and one of Kampala’s most important buildings adapted the design to local conditions and oversaw construction.

Bahá’í House of Worship-Ashgabat

All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Temple of Australia, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome. Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature.
When Ashgabat was under Russian rule, the number of Bahá’ís in the city rose to over 1,000, and a Bahá’í community was established, with its own schools, medical facilities and cemetery.